FAIR ENOUGH

things I think are bossy

click on pictures for more info
Ring Jacket

Ring Jacket

This is a God-Level polo, true story. 

This is a God-Level polo, true story. 

FINAL

FINAL

thanks for the beers @carsonstreet

thanks for the beers @carsonstreet

photo booth

photo booth

After Visiting Friends - Michael Hainey

Michael Hainey’s style is that of a reporter writing a novel. He writes in clipped sentences that often leave out the subject and begin with a verb. There are plenty of two word sentences that punctuate his paragraphs. 
In describing how he felt after his dad’s death, Hainey says, “It all made me feel ashamed. Weak. A failure.” Rather than spend a paragraph, he uses single words to quickly cover a range of feelings. Later in the book, he uses short bursts to describe a scene. “My mother calls. I’m on the Ohio Turnpike. It’s Saturday, 8 a.m.” 
Hainey’s style matches the book’s theme of Journalism and Newspapermen. In the book, old friends tell Hainey that his father, Bob, was a master of writing attention-grabbing titles. Hainey has inherited that trait, and applied it to the bodies of his text as well. He intuitively understands economy of language, and knows how to say a lot in as little space as possible.
He does this when he recounts pragmatic statements from his travels that, on second thought, carry serious emotional weight. Kay, an old friend of Bob’s, takes Hainey and his brother out for dinner. They get back in the car after a long dinner filled with serious conversation. Hainey beckons Kay to sit up front with him, saying, “I’ll never find my way back without you guiding me.” This statement pulls double duty because Hainey needs Kay to lead him back to the motel, but also back in time to discover the truth about his father. 
Earlier in the book, a tornado ravages Hainey’s childhood home. Repairmen come to check the walls and floor for rot. “Before you can go on,” one of the men tells Hainey, “you gotta make sure your walls are strong.” Hainey layers weighty sentiment underneath everyday language. In this way, the memoir is very emotional, but not on the surface. It gets away with didacticism, because the lessons are always wrapped in verbs, in real-life goings-on. 
I recommend this book for its style. Read the sentences slowly and consider how much is packed into them. 

After Visiting Friends - Michael Hainey

Read More